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  • Glenn Hearson

APEX Study to better understand asthma attacks has fully recruited

Updated: Apr 18, 2023

Senior research nurse Karen Shaw with research fellows Rob Needham and Dr Ashish Pradhan have recruited the last required patient into the APEX-2 study.


In total they have recruited 302 patients into the APEX-1 and APEX-2 studies, a phenomenal achievement and incredible dedication and hard work by them.


In addition to recruiting to the required numbers for the APEX studies and performing participants baseline visits, they have also seen and assess 127 participants so far who were undergoing a suspected asthma attack and 96 annual participant visits.


Our NIHR Nottingham BRC Scientists Laura Pemberton and Helen Lee have also played a major role in the APEX Studies ensuring that all the array of different samples are assessed, processed, recorded and sent over to our science group at the University of Nottingham Biodiscovery Institute the same day along with many other aspects required for processing and storage of tissue samples.


Participants in the APEX studies will have an annual visits within the next 12 months and the study will end in February 2024.


Background

Asthma is a common lung condition affecting millions of people across the globe. With participants help, we can try to understand more about the triggers of asthma attacks and how to prevent the early symptoms of asthma attacks from developing into a serious event. It is the Nottingham Asthma Centre’s number one priority to turn this research into potentially lifesaving treatments for the future.




What is the purpose of the study


Key facts about asthma attacks

Asthma attacks lead to difficulty in breathing, which can be very frightening. Some can be treated at home with extra puffs of inhalers, but some require steroid tablets and very severe attacks can require hospital treatment.


The reason for doing this research

Lots of things can cause an asthma attack and we believe different triggers may lead to different types of attacks. If we can confirm this, it may be possible to find new ways to treat asthma attacks and reduce the use of steroid tablets which may have undesirable side effects.


The aims of this study

  • We want to study a large group of people with asthma of any severity.

  • We will perform some tests when your asthma is stable and then try and repeat them if you have an attack.

  • WE WILL NOT CHANGE ANY OF YOUR CURRENT TREATMENT AND WE ARE NOT TESTING ANY NEW TREATMENTS ON YOU IN THIS STUDY.

This will

Help us to understand more about what causes asthma attacks and whether people have different types of attacks.


APEX STUDY PEOPLE:

Research Fellows Rob Needham, Dr Ashish Pradhan, Research Nurse Karen Shaw
The APEX Asthma Attack Team: Rob Needham, Ashish Pradhan, Karen Shaw

Chief Investigator: Professor Tim Harrison

Study Lead: Dr Ashish Pradhan


For more information;


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