• Glenn Hearson

The WAYFINDER study: To assess the efficacy and safety of tezepelumab in Adults With Severe Asthma

We have recently commenced a new severe asthma study sponsored by AstraZeneca which is being led at Nottingham University Hospitals by Dr Matthew Martin.


WAYFINDER is being recruited to, and delivered by, our commercial team; Tina, Charlotte, Hannah and Chloe.


A Multicentre, Single-arm, Phase 3b Efficacy and Safety Study of Tezepelumab 210 mg Administered Subcutaneously to Reduce Oral Corticosteroid Use in Adult Participants with Severe Asthma on High-dose Inhaled Corticosteroid plus Long-acting β2 Agonist and Long-term Oral Corticosteroid Therapy (WAYFINDER)


What is this study about?

We are doing this study to learn more about an investigational drug called tezepelumab for the treatment of severe asthma. Investigational means that the drug is not approved by any health authority, except for use in research studies like this. We want to learn if the study drug, tezepelumab, can help people with severe asthma who regularly take oral corticosteroids (OCS, such as prednisone or prednisolone) to reduce the dose or even discontinue using OCS without losing asthma control. Long-term use of OCS is associated with several side effects including osteoporosis (a condition that causes bones to gradually thin and weaken), hypertension, depression and a decrease in adrenal gland hormones.


Tezepelumab is a monoclonal antibody. A monoclonal antibody is a protein produced by the body as part of the immune system. Tezepelumab has been designed to recognise and stop a certain molecule involved in lung inflammation.


This is a phase IIIb study which means that all required testing is complete, but additional data is being collected to inform clinicians regarding the efficacy of tezepelumab in patients taking long-term OCS therapy. It is expected that about 300 people will take part in this study globally.


Fore more information Contact:

Dr Matthew Martin

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